So…I am in Mexico…in the Midst of a Pandemic

Being a permanent nomad can be a bit confusing. I often am asked, “Where are you from?” and I find myself in a pickle. How do I answer? Especially now…when I am supposed to be “home”—wherever that is—self-quarantining/laying low/whatever the correct living situation de jour is in the United States.

I don’t have a permanent home/address. This is something that kind of evolved after my last trip abroad, when I planned to be gone for six months and just kinda’ forgot to go home for two years. I was in my home town (the one where I was raised) of Corpus Christi, Texas when COVID hit. I have no problem staying put. I have lots of creative projects to work on that don’t require me to go out much. And I stayed put for 5 months, but a situation arose that required me to move.

I could have just gotten a different place to live in Corpus, but instead, my itchy feet kicked in. So my daughter and I embarked on a three-month road trip around the western USA. It was great…until it got too cold to sleep in a tent. So we bunkered down in Arizona for a while.

Rebecca & Cathy knitting by the campfire
Knitting by the campfire with daughter Rebecca during our road trip.

By February, I needed to find a more affordable place to live. Besides, I was ready to re-immerse in another culture. So I took the plunge to move to Mexico until…well…whenever.

I do a lot of research before moving on to another place and by the time I arrive, I am pretty comfortable in my surroundings. I chose Guanajuato because it is a bit off the tourist track and it has a reputation for being clean and safe. I also loved the photos I saw of this colorful city. AND, I found an AirBnb room that was affordable and beautiful.

Guanajuato

View from my bedroom in Guanajuato
View from my guesthouse in Guanajuanto, Mexico

Once I was here, I found that the population is taking COVID at least as seriously as they do in Arizona and Texas. Cubrebocas (masks, or literally “cover mouth”) are required everywhere and almost everyone wears them on the street. (Oh…hmmm…I guess that is not true in Texas anymore.) Sanitizer is ubiquitous.

I go out to get groceries, and a couple times a week I go to the almost-empty café down the street to enjoy chiliquiles or a sandwich. Otherwise, I continue to enjoy my creative projects in my beautiful room overlooking the city.

So…here are a few photos of my time in this small city that I guess is “home” for now.

First, the Food…

Chiliquiles for a “second” breakfast. (Cost MXN $85/US $4.20, including juice, coffee & bread)
Hand made corn tortillas
My host, Mario, advised me to purchase these hand-made corn tortillas from a woman who sells them on the street nearby. Good idea! (MXN $10/US $0.50 for 12)
Rotisserie Chicken in Guanajuato, Mexico
I purchase a rotissiere chicken about once a week and use it for sandwiches, salads, pasta topping…until it runs out. Then I boil the bones for soup stock. (MXN $120/US $5.90)

Walking Around Town…

Park in Guanajuato
Park in Guanajuato

Guanajuato is full of lovely, restful, shady plazas and parks. Often the trees have been pruned in a squarish pattern that is characteristic of the city’s style.

Traffic tunnels in Guanajuato, Mexico
The city is also known for diverting traffic in tunnels. Entrances and exits like this one are seen all over town.
Church of Our Lady of Guanajuato
You cannot walk to Centro Historico without seeing the iconic Church of Our Lady of Guanajuato in all her golden beauty.
Guanajuato has embraced all things Cervantes and even has a Festival in his honor in October. Statues of Miguel Cervantes and Don Quixote are sprinkled around town.
Flower Stalls in Guanajuato
Last Friday was Dia de las Flores, and one street was colorfully blocked with flower sellers and their wares. This marks the beginning of Semana Santa, Holy Week.
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Coming “Home”… 

A few of MANY steps in Guanajuato
I have to climb up Calle del Espinazo to reach my guesthouse. Another thing that Guanajuato is known for is the colorful buildings. People seem to try to out-do each other in choosing colors for their homes. That is one thing that makes the city views so spectacular.

By the time I reach my place, I am happy to see this door…that opens out to the foyer, courtyard, and view beyond.

Dragonfruit Flowers
On the top of the guesthouse courtyard wall, a flowering dragon fruit plant. They only flower for one day and for some reason I chose that morning to look UP.

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Cathy Fulton

Cathy Fulton

I am Cathy Fulton and I became a world nomad in 2014. Traveling has become a way of life for me. Except for the fact that I am a citizen of the United States, I don’t have a residence. I am retired and I like to travel solo and independently. I don’t know how many times I have heard, “You are living my dream.” My reply is, “It doesn’t have to be a dream. It can be a reality!"

2 thoughts on “So…I am in Mexico…in the Midst of a Pandemic”

  1. Glorioso! Your research pays off once again. You have such a knack for finding primo civilizations!
    Thanks for sharing Cathy!

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